Menu
Home Page

Welcome to

Newton Farm Nursery, Infant & Junior School

Values

Newton Farm Values are British Values

 

The DfE have reinforced the need “to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.”

 

At Newton Farm Nursery, Infant & Junior School we value the diverse ethnic backgrounds of all pupils and families and undertake a variety of events and lessons to celebrate these. We have found this approach to be enriching for all parties as it teaches tolerance and respect for the differences in our community and the wider world. Our values are underpinned by our Rights Respecting ethos – linked to the UNCRC (United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child) https://www.unicef.org.uk/what-we-do/un-convention-child-rights/

 

At Newton Farm these values are reinforced regularly and in the following ways:

 

Democracy:

 

UNCRC Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen, when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account.

 

Democracy is ubiquitous within the school. Pupils have the opportunity to have their voices heard through our School Council, Learning Council, Playground Pals and pupil questionnaires. Newton Farm School is a Rights Respecting school. Each year the children decide upon their class charter and the rights and responsibilities associated with these. All the children contribute to the drawing up of the charter. Democracy is also promoted through additional PSHE lessons and assemblies. Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which contain articles relating to democracy, and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.

 

The Rule of Law:

 

UNCRC Article 19: Governments should ensure that children are properly cared for, and protect them from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them.

 

The importance of Laws, whether they be those that govern the class, the school, or the country, are consistently reinforced throughout regular school days, as well as when dealing with behaviour and through school collective worship. Pupils are taught the value and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken. Visits from authorities such as the Fire Service, Road Safety Officers and the police are regular parts of our calendar and help reinforce this message. We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy. There are rewards for exhibiting good and caring behaviour and consistent demonstration of our values is recognised through our weekly awards assemblies.

Through our school assemblies and PSHE children are taught how to earn trust and respect and are supported to develop a strong sense of morality; knowing right from wrong and doing the right thing even when it is difficult. Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which contains articles relating to justice and the rule of law, and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others

 

Individual Liberty:

 

UNCRC Article 31: All children have a right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of activities.

 

UNCRC Article 15: Children have the right to meet together and to join groups and organisations, as long as this does not stop other people from enjoying their rights.

 

Within school, pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for young pupils to make choices safety, through provision of a safe environment and empowering education. Pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are advised how to exercise these safely, for example through our E-Safety and PSHE lessons. Whether it be through choice of the challenges they engage with during the school day, how they record their learning in the classroom or their choices about which of our numerous extra-curricular clubs and opportunities they engage with, pupils are given the freedom to make choices at Newton Farm. Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which contains articles relating to individual liberty, and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.

 

Mutual Respect:

 

UNCRC Article 2: The Convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say and whatever type of family they come from.

 

UNCRC Article 30: Children have a right to learn and use the language and customs of their families, whether these are shared by the majority of people in the country or not.

 

We have high expectations about pupil conduct and this is reflected in our Behaviour Policy and Single Equality Policy.

Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which contains articles which relate to we should treat each other, and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.

Mutual respect is promoted through additional PSHE lessons and assemblies. A range of specific assemblies are delivered focusing on helping other pupils to understand specific special needs. 

Displays around the school promote respect for others and this is reiterated through our classroom and learning rules, as well as our Behaviour policy.

 

Tolerance of those of Different Faiths and Beliefs:

 

UNCRC Article 14: Children have the right to think and believe what they want, and to practise their religion, as long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights. Parents should guide their children on these matters.

 

Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs is promoted through the Syllabus for Religious Education. Children learn about different religions, their beliefs, places of worship and festivals. The children’s work on this subject or whole school learning in assemblies is often displayed in the classrooms or around the school.

This is supplemented by assemblies which also mark and celebrate significant religious festivals such as Ramadan and Diwali.

Visits are made by local religious leaders and children have the opportunity to visit places of worship.

Children are taught about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which contains articles relating to how different faiths should be respected, and learn to respect their rights and the rights of others.

Top